Elon Musk’s Neuralink testing brain implant technology

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Elon Musk

FILE – In this March 14, 2019, file photo Tesla CEO Elon Musk speaks before unveiling the Model Y at Tesla’s design studio in Hawthorne, Calif. Musk says in an internal memo that Tesla has enough orders to set a record, but it’s having trouble shipping vehicles to the right locations.(AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)

San Francisco, California — Elon Musk’s start-up Neuralink is aiming to connect the human brain with a machine interface “before the end of next year”, the CEO announced on Tuesday.

Speaking at a conference in San Francisco, Musk presented ‘version one” of his neuron-sized threads and micro processor chips that he claims will help people with severe brain injuries and eventually grow to allow humans to connect with advancing artificial intelligence (A.I.) technology.

“This, I think, has a very good purpose which is to cure important diseases and ultimately to help secure humanity’s future as a civilization relative to A.I.,” said Musk during the conference.

The implantation of the threads, which Musk said are a tenth the size of a human hair, require the use of a special robot, but a minimally invasive surgery.

Once the threads are implanted into the brain, their connecting chip would wirelessly connect with a device worn outside the body.

“It’s basically Bluetooth to your phone,” said Musk. “We’ll have to watch the app store updates for that one. Make sure we don’t have a driver issue.”

Neuralink is seeking U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval and while Musk said his preliminary task is to help people with disabilities interface with computers using their minds, the end goal is to keep up with A.I.

Tuesday’s conference was designed as a marketing tool – Musk told the crowd gathered at the California Academy of Sciences that Neuralink was actively seeking out potential employees to join their team.

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